A Study in Case Studies

by Erik Ozolins, Professor of Anthropology at Mt. San Jacinto College

Since the semester ended last month, I thought I should provide an update on the internship class in which the students participated. Of the 7 students who registered for the class, 6 completed the semester, all earning passing grades. The 6 students wrote numerous pages on the various fossil hominin species, as well as a number of other more specific pieces of information. We are currently calling these special interest components “case studies” and as of now they include interesting aspects of paleoanthropology such as Acheulean Tools or Shanidar I.

479px-Shanidar_skull

Shanidar I. Image Source.

I believe the identification of these “case studies” was one of the most valuable aspects of the student internship class. At this point we are not sure how much of what the students wrote about each of the fossil species will ultimately get into the exhibit. The student interns and a few others (who have now started working with us but were unable to take the class) are currently working to try to turn their pages of research into panel size pieces of information for museum guests.

During our regular meetings with the Museum staff, however, we would have the students share their favorite parts of their research and as we discussed their ideas and discoveries we realized that we wanted to spotlight many of these specific stories. These are the case studies. They are the surprising, engrossing, humorous or disturbing stories that are associated with paleoanthropology, but they are also the interesting stories that will connect with the museum guests.  These are often the stories that I like to highlight in my college classes, that I think make the information accessible to my students.

As summer is moving along we are still meeting. As I mentioned, the students are working on putting their information into panel form. Over the course of the semester, I had the class and the grade to hold over their head. Now, with the semester being over, the students are working without that incentive. They appear equally interested and driven as during the semester. At this point, they are as invested in this project as the museum is and as I am. We are also meeting and discussing some of the other, more interactive, aspects of the exhibit. I am not going to tell you what they are yet, but rest assured if we can do what we want to do, they will be very cool!

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