All In

by J. M. Sandlin, Museum Intern

I’m not exactly your typical community college student. With a time-yellowed bachelor’s degree from UCLA and at least two distinct careers under my belt, I tend to think of (and often describe) myself as an old dog in search of new tricks. Sometimes I find what I’m looking for–worthwhile sources of amusement and edification–in the varied curriculum of Mt. San Jacinto College.

MSJC is a mid-sized school with a laid-back atmosphere and more than a few genuinely caring educators. In early January I received an email from longtime MSJC faculty member Pam Ford, informing me of an upcoming opportunity to assist in the development of an exhibit at the Western Science Center. I couldn’t have been more delighted with the idea! For me, as a devotee of all things old and obscure, good museums are among life’s enduring pleasures. And the Western Science Center is rightly called a beacon of light in the Inland Empire’s small community of museums.

With Pam’s email duly read and responded to, I soon found myself seated loftily (if somewhat uncomfortably) atop the exhibition bandwagon, headed, along with my fellow student-interns, to the promised land of cool stuff. The view from that vantage point, however, was not at all what I had expected. For in front of us, stretching as far as the mind’s eye could see, lay a nicely tilled but otherwise unsown intellectual landscape. Suddenly it dawned on me–we were starting this thing from scratch!

The overarching theme had been determined for us: it was to be an exhibit about the evolution of humankind. Just about everything else, though, was up for grabs. We needed a title. We needed artifacts to display. We needed access to the latest research. In short, we needed a plan!

At first, the unfamiliar, unpronounceable, polysyllabic science-speak made my head spin. I’m a businessman-cum-historian. What did I know about science? What, realistically, could I hope to contribute to a scientific exhibition? For answers, I turned to MSJC Professor Erik Ozolins, the college’s front man for this endeavor, and WSC director, Dr. Alton Dooley.

Professor Ozolins and Dr. Dooley, presiding jointly (and somewhat intimidatingly) over the preliminary exhibition meeting, looked down WSC’s elongated conference table and addressed us would-be student-interns with kindness and reassurance. You can do it, they admonished us; you can help bring this exhibit to life!

That was exactly what I needed to hear. Yes, we’d be starting from scratch. And yes, the road ahead was likely to be a bumpy one. But come what may, from that day forward, I was all in.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s