From the Navy to the Museum

by Bo Chesire, Museum Intern

After 8 years in the Navy the only things I wanted were not to shave, not get a hair cut, and go to college. But as far as what I wanted to go to college for, I really didn’t know. I had spent my time in the Navy as a Hospital Corpsman (the seafarer’s term for medic) and I was quite good at my job and definitely enjoyed helping people.

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Bo Chesire, Museum Intern, during his military service.

I had previously taken a lot of biology classes and even a little anatomy and physiology. However, in those classes, they seemed to skim over human evolution and I had some questions about how we became us. So while searching the college catalog before my separation from the Navy, I found a class titled “Physical Anthropology”. I reasoned that it would benefit me as an aspiring physician’s assistant to understand our evolutionary heritage. So I signed up.

Within the first week of classes I knew that anthropology was going to be my major. I love how inclusive the the discipline is, combining our evolutionary heritage, linguistic ability, culture, and tying it all together with the evidence from archaeology. As a study, it is all encompassing and has a little something for everyone.

That first semester I got to know Professor Ozolins and Professor Ford well. They were really helpful in guiding me and giving me valuable advice for the next stage in my education. When I received an email from Professor Ozolins over winter break about a potential internship with the Western Science Center, I knew I needed to be a part of it.

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Bo holding a “hobbit” skull.

For me this is an opportunity to give back to the school and program that has been a major part of a very important transition in my life. I know many people who have left military service and not thrived; I can attribute my own success to the fun and interesting people at MSJC. I also hope this exhibit will serve to educate a large portion of the population that might not know about the story of human evolution. Trust me; it’s a fascinating one, and you won’t want to miss it.

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